The Financial Planning Association of Australia The Financial Planning Association of Australia

Parents struggle to raise Invisible-Money Generation kids


“3 in 5 Australian parents believe their children will be financially worse off”

The Financial Planning Association (FPA) of Australia has identified a new generation of
children and teenagers born since the Year 2000 it calls the “Invisible-Money Generation”
— those aged 18 years and below for whom money is often unseen in the form of online
transactions, credit and debit cards, and ‘tap and go’.

The report released today by the FPA, which coincides with Financial Planning Week
2018, reveals two thirds of Australian parents (66%) believe digital money is making it
harder for children to grasp the value of real money, and that they struggle to teach
them. Three in five parents (62%) believe this Invisible-Money Generation will be
financially worse off than their own generation.

Tipping point in national spending habits

The FPA ‘ Share the Dream ’ report shows this Invisible-Money Generation is forcing a
tipping point in national spending habits: 47 percent of 14-18 year olds are nearly as
likely to take an interest in online purchases, as they are to spend physical banknotes
and coins at the shop, for example.

Below is a summary of other key findings, full details of which can be found in the FPA
Share the Dream report, now available to the public and financial planners on
moneyandlife.com.au :

  • Talking to children about money better prepares them for the future. Alarmingly,
    66% of parents show some reluctance to speak with their kids about money.
  •  Parents who seek or have sought advice from a financial planner in the past were
    more likely to have regular chats with their kids about money than those who do
    not (61% cf. 43%).
  • 80% of parents are financially stressed, with half (51%) declaring they are very to
    moderately stressed.
  • Parents in NSW and those in regional and remote areas are most reluctant to
    discuss money with their children for fear their kids will worry.
  • Mothers (53%) are more likely to have regular chats with their children about
    money than fathers (45%).
  • Children with a paid job are more digital money savvy: 84% make online
    purchases for themselves or their family versus 56% of those without a job.

Dante De Gori CFP®, FPA CEO, said: “A stand-out insight from our research this
year is that parents who seek the advice of a financial planner create a lasting positive
legacy for their kids too, in matters of money and life.

“For starters, it makes them much more confident in having frequent conversations with
their children about money (61% compared to 43% of those who don’t seek the advice
of a financial planner), which lays a strong foundation for a better future.

“The hard reality is many of us simply don’t know when or how to talk to our kids
about money because the technologies, language and online possibilities are so
very different. So I’m proud to release our ‘Share the Dream’ eBook for any parent,
teacher or carer of children, tweens and teenagers: it has a range of activities and
practical insights to help us raise this next generation we’re calling the Invisible-Money
Generation,” he said.

“Our hope is our Share the Dream efforts this year will inspire and equip more
Australians to share the dream of a financially secure, and happy future with the
children in their world by committing to improve their own financial literacy, so they can
start talking more with kids about money — in all its forms,” he said.

The FPA ‘ Share the Dream’ report is based on research from The Curious Co obtained
through a national quantitative survey of 1,003 Australian parents who have children
aged between 4 and 18. The research was conducted between 13-25 June 2018. The
sample is nationally representative of parents by gender, age between 4 and 18. The
research was conducted between 13-25 June 2018. The sample is nationally
representative of parents by gender, age and state, defined as individuals who care
for children in the 2016 ABS Census.